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speargun
14th March 2007, 07:37 AM
I'm asking about schlogging stance when you are on what I would consider a super-sinker! I am 100kg and mainly sail an 85litre board (Thommen x85) in some onshore wave but mostly bump and jump over 20 knots. When the wind doesn't cooperate which is very often due to gusty conditions I have developed a bit of a schlogging stance which is to hang almost like doing a chin-up right off the boom, this means I am almost kneeling on the board, not exactly kneeling but very close to it. I find I am able to keep things stable this way - the object being to get the weight off the feet and onto the mast base. But then I also find that sometimes I can just stand up from my kneeling position in the same wind and still carry on without the kneeling stance. I was curious if other people, say heavyweights or those on boards that won't come close to supporting your weight have adopted this sort of stance? Or is it just a waste of time and maybe I should learn another way of schlogging. Is it bad technique, do people do this? I don't see any body else doing this where I sail but then again most of them are on boards that are about equivalent or more than their body weight in litres of volume/kilos of body weight...

Roger
15th March 2007, 09:59 PM
Hi Speargun,
I took a bit of time to think this one over, as I don't know really what to say.
If your hanging from the boom technique keeps you going on your super sinker board, then I'd say continue to do what works for you.
I don't remember ever seeing anyone else use this technique, but that does not make it wrong, perhaps just a unique technique you've developed that works for you in your conditions with your gear.
I think most sailors actually stand up, maybe put a foot up by the mast foot (or sometimes in front of it depending on the volume distribution in the board) and get right over the centerline of the board.
At slogging speeds, mast foot pressure really does'nt give the benefits that it does when planing, so MFP is probably not the "secret ingredient" here.
But, if it works for you, keep doing it, as it sure beats swimming, right?
Hope this helps,