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MA_Pete
11th September 2006, 08:36 PM
Roger:

Thanks for the input on the other thread below. A couple more questions (starting a new thread as my questions below got lost in the middle of a long thread):

1) From the sounds of the above, you seemed to like the Huckers better than the Retros for the iSonic. What did you like better about them?

2) For quickest planing on the iSonic what do you do? Head downwind and pump? Do you start with the front foot in the strap like on the F-Type, or is the technique different?

3) For control at speed, any tips? When I am going fast over chop (not huge chop), I feel a bit out of control sometimes, too much bouncing and heels catching in the water. I get a little more control when I put more pressure on the rear foot and lift the front foot to get the nose up, but I am still not quite comfortable and in control even then. This board receives very high praise from everyone on control in chop, so I am pretty sure it is a technique issue.

Thanks!

-Pete

Roger
11th September 2006, 08:59 PM
Hi Pete,
Your questions didn't get lost, I've just been unable to find the time to answer them.
Give me another day or 2 to think over your issues.
Just so you know, I was sent from Cape Hatteras out to Seattle Washingtom last Wednesday, to repair a ship,
I didn't get back home to Cape Hatteras until 10 pm last nite, and I need to be in Orlando, Florida with my truck and trailer sometime tomorrow morning, so I haven't been finding the time to put on my
internet instructors hat and answer any questions here.
Please bear with me until I get to Orlando.
Too many good questions and not enough hours in the day. Sorry!
Thanks,
Roger

MA_Pete
11th September 2006, 09:13 PM
Roger:

No problem. I re-posted the questions as I would imagine sometimes it is difficult for you to see questions that get buried in the middle of the threads.

Safe travels! Enjoy the Surf Expo.

-Pete

Roger
12th September 2006, 12:52 PM
Hi Pete,
Surf Expo's going to be a bit of hard work, setting up booths, moving all the board in, etc. and then a 2 day demo the day after, but it'll be worth it to have the new '07 boards.
I'm hopefully picking them up this morning! :)
I hope to get to your question later in the day or tonite!
R

Roger
23rd September 2006, 01:16 PM
Hi Pete,
I'll paste in your questions here and answer them one at a time.
1) From the sounds of the above, you seemed to like the Huckers better than the Retros for the iSonic. What did you like better about them?

I feel the Hucker's have a bit more top speed, and while they feel a little more "pitchy" at first, once you get used to this feeling, and get the Hucker on the right mast to put it in "speed-slalom" mode, I think the Huckers work a little better for me.
Nothing at all wrong with the Retro's for this purpose, it's mostly that the Huckers are my "new" sails and I'm using them more to find out as much about tining them as possible. I also have a 9.1 NX Formula and now a new 7.8 NX to try against the Huckers and Retros.
I think each type of sail has it's strong points and none of them have anything that I would call "weak points".
So, for now, I'm using the Huckers alot, and plan to try out the new 7.8 NX as soon as I get the conditions.
The 9.1 NX Formula has become my new light wind sail as I'm rigging it on a 490 cm SW Lightstik mast and it makes the 4 cam NX seem lighter than my 10.0 m2 Retro which rigs on a 520 mast.

2) For quickest planing on the iSonic what do you do? Head downwind and pump? Do you start with the front foot in the strap like on the F-Type, or is the technique different?

Maybe I'm just getting lazy and older, but I didn't find that pumping was the quickest way to get on plane.
Yes, bear off, maybe flutter pump the rig and fin a bit and the Isonics just seem to "slide" onto a plane.
For really marginal winds, full body (all you've got) rig pumping can be effective, but looking for ways to bear off and "ooch" the board onto a plane seems nearly as effective.
You can move back until the front foot is in the strap but you are not yet hooked in in really marginal conditions, then shift your weight between the front and back foot to get the fore and aft (pitch) angle of attack to optimum and the board will slide onto a plane pretty easy.
In more powered conditions, I hook in first, then get the front footstrap and get up to nearly full speed, then find the back strap, and begin to sail "on the fin". Fast and easy, but just because it works for me does not mean it will be the best for you.
Try different things:
Boom height
Mast foot positon
Fins
Sail tuning
All of these are important aspects of getting the optimum "balance" on the Isonics, and when you get if right, you will be very fast, plane early and everything will see effortless.

3) For control at speed, any tips? When I am going fast over chop (not huge chop), I feel a bit out of control sometimes, too much bouncing and heels catching in the water. I get a little more control when I put more pressure on the rear foot and lift the front foot to get the nose up, but I am still not quite comfortable and in control even then. This board receives very high praise from everyone on control in chop, so I am pretty sure it is a technique issue.

If I'm reading you right, you have the impression that lifting the front foot lifts the front of the board.
I've never found this to be true and as I remember you are my size or smaller so it's probably even less true for you.
Big guys (190 lb. +) do something with their weight that seems to lift the front of the board (how else can they sail with the mast foot fully forward for good upwind speed and angle on formula boards) but we smaller and lighter sailors can't do this, in my experience.
Lifting with the front foot, while really pusing hard across the top of the fin with the back foot (across the top of the board and parallel with the water's surface, not DOWN) allows you to rail the board slightly and this helps to get max. fin lift (across the top of the water in the upwind direction) so you can begin to "ride the fin" and get more of the board clear of the water.
When you "rail" your board slightly to leeward, you get both horizontal and a tiny bit of vertical lift.
When you can get you board to be really fast and free, with less of the board touching the water, control in chop gets easier because the board almost "picks it's own way" through and over the chop with much less pitch AOA change. The board seems to "level out" and just ride over the chop. Helps to get the mast foot as far back as possible so you have less
of the board "in the water" for the chop to work on and cause bounding and rebounding cycles that are hard to control.
To go faster, and on a beam reach, flatten the board out (rail to rail or the roll axis) as much as possible, and lighten up on the fin pressure.
Hope this helps,

MA_Pete
30th September 2006, 05:22 AM
Roger:

Thanks, I will give these tips a try my next time out.

-Pete

Roger
1st October 2006, 10:44 PM
Hi Pete,
The above is what has worked for me.
If you really want fast, try shifting a little weight onto your front foot (this is Ian Fox's Isonic "turbo charging" tip) as you take some "push" off the fin.
It seems to "settle" the board a bit and cause you to bear off slightly, increasing your speed in the process.
As far as control in chop, a smaller fin can often make a world of difference.
A lot of guys are using < 30 cm vertical slalom fins (similar to the OEM Drake 42 and 34 cm&#39;s) with great results on the smaller Isonics.
I haven&#39;t sailed the Isonic 125, but I&#39;m pretty sure that the design parameters are similar with the 115 and 105, so the tuning and techniques needed would be pretty much the same as well.
Don&#39;t be afraid to use a really small fin that seems to "spin out" and not give you good upwind at slower speeds.
When you lite the Isonic up, the water gets flowing faster past the fin, and a really tiny fin can feel "solid as a rock" once you get the flow needed.
Hope this helps,

o2bnme
2nd October 2006, 10:27 AM
Roger, I&#39;ve been working on trying to figure out Ian&#39;s tip. Can you help explain how I should go about getting more weight on the front foot? I can do it for brief periods, but I can&#39;t seem to keep that pressure up front for long. Should I be moving the footstraps forward or shifting the mast forward or back?

I recently purchased a 30cm Goldwing for my iS105. Man, that fin is awesome. It does spin out when the board hasn&#39;t taken off. All I have to do is bear off the wind a bit and get things moving. Then, once the fin can be loaded up, it takes off. The board is much easier to control and seems much faster. Now, I need to steal my wife&#39;s GPS to quantify my impression. ;-)

Peterk
8th October 2006, 09:09 PM
Hey Pete,

Its Peter from Fogland. Did you get out when Ernesto came through a few weeks ago?

I have not been down to Fogland lately because of the wind directions we have been getting. I was wondering if anyone tried to sail there while the Norteasterlies were blowing.

We were down in South Dartmouth and the winds were between 30 and 40 knots. It was nuts with five foot chop/swells and a straight onshore breeze. The old Challenge Flex got quite a workout. I need a replacement for that board, it&#39;s definately on its last leg.

Peter

MA_Pete
15th October 2006, 08:03 PM
Hey Peter, yes did get out with Ernesto. Went to third beach, was 25-30+ with huge chop, went up to Fogland and it was gusty (due to NE winds) but much flatter. Had a great session on the iSonic 125 with a 6.5, set my current speed record on that board.

Just started a new job, traveling a lot now, so haven&#39;t been out much recently...

kenneth
13th November 2006, 09:42 PM
Hi Roger,

I&#39;m planning to get the IS22. Just wondering if you have sailed this board, and what is its sweet spot in terms of sail size?

This board can take a sail up to 9.5m , but I am not sure if I should go for an 8.5m or a 9m. My favorite size is an 8.5, but a 9m would give me more low end. The other option would be 9m + 7.8m ..instead of a compromise at 8.5 ??

If IS122 is my biggest board ; the next size down would be the IS101 I suppose?

In fact I already have a Fanatic freeride which is 127L, but 69 wide (trying to sell it though), this would be an overlap with the IS122 despite the later is 75cm wide? I&#39;ve read that the width is a more appropriate way of classifying boards rather than volume...

your comments would be much appreciated!

Roger
14th November 2006, 11:31 AM
Hi Kenneth,
Sorry, but I have no experience on the Isonic 122.
I sailed the Isonic 115 alot last year, and the Isonic 105 one day in Worthington, Mn.
I&#39;ve sailed the new Isonic 145 and 101 as much as possible this year.
I&#39;d suggest going with the Isonic 122 and the 8.5 m2 rig. I don&#39;t think that going larger (even though it&#39;s within the recommended range) with the 9.0 is going to give you a real big gain in early planing.
I found the Isonic 115 to be fairly early planing last year, but I think the "sweet spot was in the 6.5 m2- 7.5 m2 range.
I&#39;ve sailed the Isonic 105 with the 6.6 m2 Hucker and a 6.5 Retro and it&#39;s pretty awesome.
I suspect that the Isonic 122 (at 75 cm wide) will get going pretty early.
Just take it off the wind and pump/ooch a little and it will take off.
Hope this helps,

kenneth
14th November 2006, 05:29 PM
Hi Roger,

Thanks! Good to hear from u again!
That sounds like what i wanted to hear ;-P So i will go for an 8,5 !

Meanwhile, i might be keen to get the IS101 as well, what&#39;s your comment on this board, and would 7.3 be the sweet spot for this board?

Thanks!!